Tag Archives: kids

Making Your Home Safe for Kids

Maybe you’re expecting an addition to your family sometime soon. That’s great, and congratulations! Or maybe you’re expecting family members to come stay for the weekend, and you need to make some quick adjustments to make the home suitable for the kids. There are a few things you’ll want to consider before both of these scenarios arise. But where do you start? Here are some things that we recommend:

A new addition

First and foremost, make sure your baby is never unattended. Take turns with your partner keeping an eye on your new bundle of joy and make sure that the baby is comfortable. Also, keep things out of baby’s reach to prevent choking. This becomes imperative as babies get older and learn how to crawl. Keep floors and surfaces clean of debris and small, chewable objects.

Second, you’ll want to consider investing in a security system. There are a lot of home security companies out there that offer a slew of different packages and pricing options, but above all, make sure you pick one with a high level of customer satisfaction. As of right now, SafeStreets USA has an impressive 7.6/10 rating according to Best Company and nearly 150 customer reviews. Contracts start at 36 months with lower monthly fees than more well-known industry competitors.

For a full guide to how home security systems work, click here.

Occasional visitors

Toddlers and small children are much more mobile than your new baby, so this is where things get complicated. There are a handful of particular things you need to protect children from, including the following:

  • Drowning
  • Electrical
  • Poisoning
  • Guns
  • Fires

Drowning isn’t much of a threat unless you have a swimming pool. If you do, you should know to keep it covered during winter months and drained if you’re not using it. If you have kids at the pool, always make sure that they’re supervised and equipped with age-appropriate flotation devices.

With electrical concerns, make sure that the wiring in your house has been done correctly. It’s not a bad idea to bring in an electrician if you’ve moved into a new place and you find that some of the light switches aren’t working correctly. Keep wall outlets covered with a plastic plug if they’re not already in use. Make sure electrical items in the kitchen and bathroom are kept out of reach.

So many things can classify as poison, from mouthwash to cleaning products. Common items that can be considered poisonous include medicine, cleaning products, mouthwash, toothpaste, or alcohol. Take them out of easily-accessible cabinets and put them in a place that will be hard to find and out of reach. If you find that a child has ingested dangerous substances, contact the National Poison Center Hotline at 1-800-222-1222.

Keep guns out of the reach of children at all times. If you insist on owning a gun, keep it hidden away in a closet or in a locked drawer or safe. Instruct kids not to touch a gun if one is found, but instead to report it to an adult.

Fires can be easily made inside or outside depending on what’s available to kids. When cooking, keep pan handles pointed toward the back of the stove so kids can’t reach up and grab them. Keep kids away from the range when items are baking. Keep matches and lighters in a safe place that isn’t easily accessed.

 

On the Spookiest of Nights, Safety Still Matters: How to Keep Kids Safe This Halloween

Always check your children’s Halloween candy to see if it has been tampered with, right? Stories of poisoned Halloween candy being randomly handed out to kids have circulated in October for years. In 1982, after the Tylenol tampering scare, candy poisoning hysteria hit its peak. Some hospitals even offered to X-ray Halloween candy for free to check for anything unusual.

We heard those rumors in our own youth, and it’s something we look for in our children’s candy hauls. You never know if one of your neighbors has decided to play the cruelest trick of all on the treats they hand out…

…except these stories aren’t true! There has never been a police report of randomly distributed poisoned Halloween candy. Although there have unfortunately been cases of specifically targeted poisoned Halloween candy and cases of harm befalling children after they’ve eaten their Halloween treats, none of these support the rumors of a devious homeowner purposely passing out modified candy on Halloween night. (Read this Snopes article if you do want a couple of chilling examples of Halloween harm…)

So if you don’t need to worry about poison or razorblades, everything’s just fine for October 31st, right? Well, not quite. It’s still a night that requires a diligent eye on the part of the parent. Here are some other items you can check for on the spookiest of holidays…

In the bag

  • Check nutrition labels on treats to make sure there are no ingredients that your child is allergic to.
  • Check goody bags for anything that could be a choking hazard, like small toys, hard candy and even gum.
  • Check to make sure your child isn’t hungry before venturing out on their candy hunt. They shouldn’t be eating any treats until they get back home so you can inspect them, and if they’re hungry, it will be harder for them to stay out of the candy.

On their costumes

  • Check to make sure your child can move in their costume, be it stepping up and down stairs or just walking without tripping over fabric.
  • Check to make sure you can see your child in the dark. Reflective strips can be attached to candy bags and their costume, or you can even find reflective costumes that look like any other normal costume—until the light shines on them, that is!
  • Check to make sure any products going on the skin, like face paint or makeup, are non-toxic and test them on a small patch of skin first prior to Halloween. If non-toxic and your child’s skin doesn’t react to it, face paint or makeup is a safe alternative to a mask, which can slip down and obstruct your child’s vision.

Out on the streets

  • Check for electronics. If a child is trick or treating without an adult, make sure they have a cell phone to use in case of an emergency. But along with the responsibility of having the phone is making sure they know to look up and pay attention to their surroundings while they’re walking. Have that talk!
  • Check both ways before crossing the street. Children are twice as likely to get hit by a car on Halloween night than on any other night. This caution goes for adults that are driving as well: Be extra cautious and on the lookout for any child darting out from behind a parked car. (And see the point above about kids looking down at cell phone screens—they can be oblivious!)

Back at home

  • Check your outside lighting, making sure your front porch is well lit as well as your yard and walkway.
  • Check your inside lighting. Indoor lights can make your home look more inviting for trick-or-treaters, as well as show any tricksters that someone is home.
  • Check for tripping hazards on your porch, in your yard and across your walkway. Even jack-o-lanterns should be placed out of the way to prevent tripping and so no loose fabric can get too close to a candle.

Although you may not be checking for poison or razor blades in your children’s treats, there are plenty of other safety factors to check before and after setting out on a candy quest. Have a happy and safe Halloween, practicing these safety tips and passing them on to your dinosaurs and storm troopers!

View all of our security plans and features!

Customer Reviews

I feel so much better knowing my family is protected! I spoke with SafeStreets USA in the evening and a technician was able to come install the system for me then for my parents first thing the next morning. Very impressed with his knowledge and care!

-

We had our ADT system installed by SafeStreets USA and were really impressed with the service we received from our technician. He was very friendly and answered all of our questions on the system and how it worked. He set everything up in a couple of hours and was a real pleasure to talk with []

-
Read more reviews