Tag Archives: maintenance

Kids Stuck Inside on a Snow Day? Check Your Home for Hazards

As many schools’ winter breaks come to an end, children are heading back to their classrooms and out of the house. But even with school back in session, some states can have up to 50 days of weather-related school closures. So on days when the weather is too crummy to even play outside, how can little ones stay safe indoors with all that bottled up energy?

If your young children are stuck inside on a snow day, here are some safety tips to keep in mind while preparing for their time off from school:

Slipping or falling opportunities
Cabin fever could mean your kids are more rambunctious than usual, which could mean running inside the house (even if they aren’t supposed to). Look around your home for anything that might present a tripping or falling hazard, such as area rugs, cords or even corners of furniture. Also remind your kids about the dangers of horseplay on furniture, since a fall from a table or sofa would be worse than from their own two feet.

Falling objects
If falling children isn’t a concern, check for any potentially falling objects. Any heavy objects like televisions or stereos should be securely fastened to a wall or stand. Other hazards to scan your rooms for are objects that could be bumped into and broken if they fell, like vases or picture frames.

Hot water in cold weather
With dropping temperatures, your heat could be on all day and all night, posing a potential problem for kids out of sight. Try to keep an eye on little ones around hot water heaters, radiators, and even stoves and microwaves. Children are most likely to be scalded by hot water in drinks or baths, so be sure to be mixing cold water into anything too hot.

Even when your kids are stuck inside at home, they can be just as safe as if they were back in their classroom. When in doubt, if you think your child might get into something they shouldn’t, assume they will and prevent it. Whether the weather is stormy or snowy, wet or simply your typical winter, check your home for these hazards to ensure your child’s safety. Maybe tomorrow it will only be a late arrival instead of a whole day off…

Winter Storms Are Coming–Have You Checked the Roof?

Even though the holiday season is over, winter only started a month ago. While some areas have been experiencing a milder winter than usual, we still have a long stretch to get through until we can put away our snow tires and heavy coats. The storm that hit the Midwest and moved East last week caused hundreds of thousands of homes to lose power. Central Missouri reported up to 17 inches of snow!

Those of us outside the Midwest might not be so concerned with winter storms, but are you and your house protected in the event of one coming through your region? Because your roof is prone to damage during winter weather, the time to fix any existing issues and prevent any future problems is now.

Here are four ways to check for signs of damage or potential damage:

Clean Your Roof
Prevention starts with cleaning. If you have a dry day to check out your roof, look for clogged gutters or loose shingles. Leaving leaves or other debris in your gutter can block water from flowing through and cause ice dams when the temperature drops below freezing. And if frozen temperatures aren’t your concern, clogged gutters still leave a buildup of water that can cause rust and other water damage. This is also the time to replace any loose shingles, as shingles are your roof’s protection against water, and you don’t want them blowing away in the next storm!

Trim the Trees
This is a risk to check for whether the weather is dry or not. Look to see if there are any tree branches (or trees!) that could fall onto the roof under the weight of snow, rain or ice. Branches could also bend lower under a heavy weight, touching the roof. Trees and branches that fall during a storm can damage the surface and the structure of your roof, so clear away any that could cause problems later on.

Fix Faulty Flashing
If wet weather is more of a concern than snow and ice, then flashing around anything on your roof is at risk. Loose flashing can–and will–let water in. Now is a good time to check for flashing on other areas of your home too, to make sure everything is secure and watertight.

Examine Your Attic
There are two ways your attic can help with winter weather protection: ventilation and water damage. If your attic is cool and well ventilated, it can prevent snow from melting and creating ice dams. Also check for any water damage visible in the attic, such as mold or damaged insulation. This could be a sign of leaks in your roof and needs to be repaired before a big storm comes rolling through.

Winter roof protection might mean no spring roof repairs, leaving you more time for fun spring cleaning around your home. Just kidding! But it can save you time and money by preventing any major problems from arising. So give your roof a check-up, grab a warm beverage, and try to stay dry and warm until April finally arrives…

This Checklist Makes a Workplace Security Self-Audit Easy

There’s something about September that makes me want to get organized. Maybe it’s the start of the new school year, which I’m still in tune with even though we’re empty nesters. I still get a thrill walking past the busy school supplies aisle while at the store, for goodness’ sakes!

Whatever it is about this time of year with the golden light and the cooler mornings, I get the urge to tackle projects, wrap up loose ends, and start anew. And that includes thinking about safety and security as the days get shorter, both at home and at work.

While perusing the Internet in search of good workplace safety tips, I came across this handy checklist:

Admittedly, we’ve done a few blog posts on workplace safety and doing safety audits, like this post on being disaster ready at work and this one on doing a home security review in the fall. But this checklist jumped out at me for three reasons:

  1. It’s easy to use! Print it out, work your way through it, and check the items off.
  2. It’s applicable to work too!
  3. It’s about everyday security.

In the wake of yet another hurricane (hello, Florence), we can get wrapped up in disaster preparedness and thinking about emergency situations. But the reality is we are more likely to get hurt or burgled during a normal day than we are to find ourselves caught in a natural disaster situation. And that’s why a simple safety audit like this one is a good way to go, to take steps to increase safety and security at all times.

If you own a business or work offsite at one, take a look at this checklist and consider printing it out, doing a walk-through, and fixing some of those little issues that put you at risk.

If you want to do a more thorough job and address disaster preparedness too, you can find a much more detailed workplace safety checklist offered by the Nonprofit Risk Management Center. There you’ll also find hundreds of checklists, forms, job descriptions and other resources, all focused on workplace safety.

Because the kids are back in school and they’re not the only ones with projects to tackle this fall…

Don’t Come Home to a Stench! 8 Ways to Prepare Your Home Before Your Vacation

Getting ready for your getaway? Good for you! But first, make sure your house is ready for you to be gone. We’ve talked before about preparing to be away, with a post on five ways to make your house look occupied while you’re gonein order to deter burglars. Those tips are:

 

  • Tip 1: Get a house sitter
  • Tip 2: Leave a car in the driveway
  • Tip 3: Hire someone to take care of your lawn and yard
  • Tip 4: Keep the electronics going
  • Tip 5: Keep your vacation to yourself

And of course there are the obvious tips like put your mail and newspaper subscription on hold so papers aren’t piling up and screaming “this house is empty!” to interested passers by.

But there are other precautions to take before you go to besides making it look lived in, steps you can take to make sure you’re not neglecting important tasks or leaving behind a potential mess you’ll have to contend with when you get home. Definitely follow our advice to make your house look occupiedwhile you’re on vacation, but also do the following so your homecoming can be as pleasant as can be:

1) Tell a trusted neighbor you’ll be gone. If you have a house sitter lined up, make sure your neighbor knows so they’re not wondering who the stranger is. It’s also nice for your house sitter to know there is a neighbor to reach out to should something happen. If you don’t have a house sitter, you’ll want that neighbor to keep an eye on your house while you’re gone. And if you’ve arranged for lawn care or something while you’re gone, make sure that neighbor knows it’s okay for those people to be on the property!

2) Make sure the bills are caught up. I get so caught up in getting ready to get away—like trying to get ahead of work or shopping for last minute items—that I sometimes forget to keep up with the regular household duties like paying the bills. Try to be mindful of anything that will be due while you’re gone and take care of it ahead of time.

3) Clean out the fridge. Now we’re moving into the territory that drives my husband crazy. He doesn’t understand why I have to clean out the fridge before we go away. But if I don’t, we risk coming home to stinky spoiled food that will have to be thrown out anyway—leaving behind a stench! Or produce that’s gone slimy that I won’t want to touch. Or milk that has soured. Ugh! It also helps to keep the grocery shopping to a minimum ahead of time or plan to eat up leftovers or have your own episode of “Chopped” in order to use up what you can before leaving. Even if we have a house sitter, I will toss food rather than assume they’ll eat it.

4) Wash all the dishes. There are two things that can be left in the sink when we leave: a water glass and a coffee cup. Even if it’s the last thing I do before walking out the door, I’m washing dishes. Otherwise I not only have stink to come home to, but the equivalent of cement to chisel out of that bowl or pot. Is that something I want to take on after a restful get away? No!

5) Take out the trash and the recycling. Like cleaning out the fridge, emptying all garbage cans and recycling bins will cut down on possible stench when you get back. Yes, recycling too, because that trace of milk in the carton or dogfood in the can will probably stink after a few days, even if you’ve rinsed it out. If the cans need to go to the curb while you’re gone for pickup, make sure to arrange for that.

6) Run the garbage disposal. Not having a garbage disposal, I’m not sure about this one, but I have read that you should pour ½ cup of vinegar and some water into your garbage disposal and run it—again, to avoid coming home to a stinky house.

7) Do the laundry. You’ll probably come home with lots of dirty laundry, so having those laundry baskets empty before you go will be much appreciated when you come home. But dirty laundry can also hide stench in the making, which is why you want it all clean ahead of time. We’ve had that happen with only a weekend getaway, coming home to a stinky house because of a kitchen towel used to clean up who knows what that was left sitting in the basket. Ugh!

8) This last one is optional: Clean! I don’t usually have time to clean the house before we leave, but I want to, because the last thing I want to do when I come home is to tackle housework! For me, it’s like giving myself a gift to clean the house before leaving so I can ease back into the daily grind rather than jump back into. But—it’s optional.

However you prepare for your time away this summer, stay safe, be smart, and enjoy your well-earned rest!

It’s Good News, Bad News for World Password Day

Passwords. They are a necessary part of our lives, but we simply do not give them the attention they deserve. Just like exercise keeps us fit and healthy eating keeps us slim, so do strong passwords keep us safe. So why do we continue to neglect them?

Since we just had World Password Day on May 3 this year, the day we should all change our passwords, it seemed a good time to revisit the topic and see if we can’t up our game—and our level of security. So here’s the good news bad news on passwords in 2018…bad news first.

The bad news: We still use poor passwords
First, the bad news. We are still using poor passwords—as in really, really bad passwords. When SplashData published the worst passwords of 2017 list, they reported that almost 3% of us are still using 123456 as a password. Worse, almost 10% of us are using one of the 25 worst possible passwords, listed here:

  1. 123456
  2. Password
  3. 12345678
  4. qwerty
  5. 12345
  6. 123456789
  7. letmein
  8. 1234567
  9. football
  10. iloveyou
  11. admin
  12. welcome
  13. monkey
  14. login
  15. abc123
  16. starwars
  17. 123123
  18. dragon
  19. passw0rd
  20. master
  21. hello
  22. freedom
  23. whatever
  24. qazwsx
  25. trustno1

You can see a full list of the 100 worst passwords of 2017. And if you see your password on that list, change it!

The good news: An easy way to beef up your passwords
It’s not all bad news for World Password Day, however. Despite our tendency to choose poor passwords still, technology is making it easier for us to keep our information and data secure—should we choose to act on it.

This year at the World Password Day website, you’ll see a campaign for #LayerUp. Layering up simply means adding another “layer” of protection by requiring more than one step to access your data. Called either multi-factor authentication (MFA) or two-factor authentication (2FA), it’s a way to make your password require something else too, like a fingerprint or a code sent to your cellphone.

To try it out, I logged into my bank account online and sure enough found the setting to add the second layer right away. Now when I log in, I will need my password and a code sent to my cell phone. It took me less than a minute to do, and I’m glad I took the time. All you do is visit www.twofactorauth.org to find out if a website offers the extra layer, and many popular banking and social media websites do.

The World Password Day website still encourages a strong password (see password advice here), and we still encourage you to beef up those passwords a.s.a.p., but in addition to that, you can easily add this extra step or layer—and keep your information that much safer from those who would like to compromise it.

4 Tips for Home Security, Safety and Sanity When Planning Your Spring Landscaping

Spring starts next week, although if you live in an area like mine, that sounds too good to be true. Still, the calendar states that it will in fact be spring as of March 20th, and that means people are looking out at their yards and thinking about ways to spruce it up or improve it this year.

As home security is top of mind for us, as a home security systems provider, we encourage you to consider the security and safety of your home when making landscaping choices or when doing maintenance. Keep these tips in mind as the weather warms up and you head outside to add to your home’s curb appeal:

Tip 1: Forget the privacy screen
If you think you want the front of your house screened from the road and sidewalk, think again. Only refer back to our post in which a former burglar gives the scoop on which houses are most appealing to and you’ll see that burglars prefer a house with a privacy screen, whether that screen is made from a tall fence or a thick hedge.

Sure, you might gain some privacy for your front yard and porch, but so does the burglar, who can now go about breaking into your home without anyone seeing him or her.

Tip 2: Trim those bushes
Any bushes, shrubs, trees or tall plants that provide a hiding place near a door or window should be cut back—way back. Otherwise you’ve only created a cozy place for a burglar to find cover while breaking in. This applies to any shrubbery around outbuildings too, such as your garage or a toolshed that might have valuable tools or equipment.

Tip 3: Eliminate the trip hazards
Landscaping isn’t only about what you choose to plant, but also how and where. Carefully plan what you’re planting where so you’re not dragging hoses around and leaving them where people can trip over them later. Steer clear of planting anything that drops a lot of leaves or petals near a sidewalk where that can make for a slippery surface. Also be aware of the downsides of plants. I once had a very pretty barberry bush that a previous owner had planted in a flowerbed next to the driveway. When I moved in, it was an issue because it had thorns, and my kids played near it when little.

Tip 4: Also consider the allergens
To maintain your sanity, carefully plan your yard so you don’t plant anything that’s going to cause an allergic reaction. As with the tips we covered recently on reducing allergens in the home, we suggest minimizing allergens outside the home too, by making smart landscaping choices. Avoid planting anything that leads to lightweight pollen blowing in the wind. Trees to avoid include male maples and ash trees, as well as birch trees. Instead choose trees like dogwood and magnolia trees. For flowers, consider low-allergen blooms such as astible, columbine and impatiens. Find a reputable nursery, and ask the staff to help you make choices that are less likely to cause an allergic reaction later.

Spring is coming and summer will soon follow, so yes, you want to start getting your yard ready for that outdoor living now. Just make good choices as you do so, choices that take into account your home security, your family’s safety, and your exposure to the pollens and dust that can have you sneezing rather than enjoying a lovely spring day.

“Achoo!” 3 Allergens in Your Home–and How to Beat Them Back

After some very cold weather followed by some very wet weather, our neck of the woods enjoyed a couple of glorious warm and sunny days that promise spring will come again. Yes, yes it will!

Spring means we’re transitioning out of the yuck of winter weather and into the joys of summer. But it also means we are headed into a peak allergy season. To help you get a jump on keeping allergic reactions to a minimum, we offer some tips for preparing your home before the spring season starts–because being safe includes being healthy.

Decreasing allergens in the home
According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, allergies are on the rise. They already affect as many as 30% of adults and 40% of children, and allergies make up the fifth leading cause of chronic disease in the U.S.

Allergies can be triggered by substances both outside of your home such as pollen, as well as by substances inside of your home such as mold, dust mites, and pet dander. We call the triggers allergens. While you can’t control what is outside of your home, you can be proactive about decreasing the allergens that are inside of your home by paying attention to these three allergen bad guys.

Allergen Bad Guy #1: Mold spores
Mold spores trigger allergic reactions and need to be kept to a minimum. You can’t always see where mold has developed, so be extra diligent about tracking down sources and dealing with them.

Mold likes wet, and mold like humidity. Try to keep the humidity in your home at about 50%. Keep your bathroom and kitchen extra clean, since those are the rooms with the most moisture. Use your bathroom fan after bathing. And inspect all your plumbing to make sure you don’t have any leaks or mold buildup.

Allergen Bad Guy #2: Dust mites
To help decrease mold spores and dust mites both, keep your air filters clean, both those on your furnace and your air conditioning unit, if you have one. Also keep any other filters clean, as well as vents and fans like the one over your stove and the one in your bathroom, as well as any wall heaters. If your bathroom and/or kitchen fans don’t vent to the exterior, you might want to consider redoing those.

Also be willing to get rid of what’s causing the dust in the first place. De-clutter your home. Consider pulling up carpet and using washable area rugs instead. Rethink the frou frou curtains and pillows and the knickknacks. The less surface area for dust to cling to, the less dust you’ll have.

Pay close attention to your bedroom and how you can reduce dust there, because you spend a lot of time there compared to other rooms, and the bedding alone can be a dust magnet. You might even consider investing in hyperallergenic bedding.

When cleaning, damp mop your floors in addition to vacuuming, because vacumming alone won’t get at the dust.

Allergen Bad Guy #3: Pet dander
Notice we didn’t say the pets are the bad guys? Because they most definitely are not to blame. Pets add much value to our lives, but that doesn’t mean they don’t also shed hair and skin (and the skin is the dander that triggers the allergies).

Reducing the pet dander in your home requires the same steps as reducing the mold spores and dust mites: cleaning, de-cluttering, and keeping air filters clean. In addition, your pets will need some attention too. The Humane Society recommends weekly baths for dogs and cats (yes, cats) to get rid of the dander our pets naturally shed.

Spring will come and reward us for making it through yet another winter, but it will also hit many of us hard with sneezing, runny noses and even asthma. Be proactive against the pollens by doing what you can to decrease the allergens inside your home, and maybe the allergens outside won’t hit you so hard.

When so Many Dangers Threaten Your Home, Taking Every Kind of Precaution Makes Sense

Your home, your haven, your refuge…if only you could believe that it will stand the test of time and be there for you no matter what. Sadly, many people lose their homes to disasters every year, or suffer through property losses, damage or theft. Really, it’s no surprise when you consider just a few of the threats your home might face:

Earthquakes—Not every home in the U.S. sits in a quake zone, but for those that do, even a small quake can do foundation damage.

Fires, internal—According to the National Fire Protection Association, there were 369,500 home fires in the U.S. in 2013, resulting in 2,755 deaths and $6.8 billion in property damage. Fires can start within your house for all kinds of reasons, from faulty wiring to a candle left burning unattended, or even a kitchen fire.

Fires, external—Then there are the fires that originate outside of your home but still threaten it, such as wildfires, fires started by lightening, a neighbor’s house catching fire and spreading to yours, etc.

Burglars—Those who would like to exploit your prosperity by stealing from you also threaten your home, taking not only your property but also your peace of mind…and potentially causing damage to your home if they force entry through a door or window.

Pests—Carpenter ants, powder post beetles, termites, oh my! We live in house built in 1890 that had such extreme pest damage, we had to rebuild one-third of the house. The insects had destroyed floor joists, walls, ceilings, framing…you name it.

Water—Which brings me to water, by which I mean leaks: Even the tiniest leak can lead to extensive damage to your home. In our situation, the pests were drawn to the wet wood that was the result of water getting in through poorly maintained windows and siding. That was on the south side of the house. On the north side, leaky kitchen plumbing had rotted out almost the entire floor.

Flooding, internal—Another kind of water danger is flooding caused by something with the home, from burst pipes or a water heater gone haywire.

Flooding, external—Then there’s the flooding caused by nature, such as the basement flooding in a heavy rainstorm, or flooding from rising waters. No matter the reason for the flooding, your home is going to get damaged!

Falling trees or branches—Then there are the gravity-driven events, like trees falling over or branches breaking off…and falling right onto your roof.

Collisions—OK, so this one is a bit of a stretch, but it can and does happen: Your house could be hit by a car, a truck or even an airplane!

Lightening—Lightening is another less common threat to your home but it is still a threat and you must be ready to react if something happens.

Vandals—Another less common threat to your home but a valid one is the obnoxious vandal, the teen spray painting your fence in the dark of the night or breaking windows while you’re off at work.

So why pull together such a depressing and frightening list? Only to make the point that we as homeowners should all do everything we can to protect our homes, property and family, because you never know what kind of man-made or natural disaster might strike. Keeping up with home maintenance, investing in a home security system that includes fire and flood detection, and taking steps to make your home less inviting to outsiders are all proactive ways to protect what you can to the best of your abilities.

4 Ways to Be Safe When Maintaining Your Yard

If you have a yard, you’ve probably been out mowing or weeding more than once already now that May is well under way. Since you’ll likely be out there again soon–like this weekend–let’s make sure you’re being safe while being mindful of your yard’s maintenance, so you’re able to enjoy it in peace…and in one piece.

1) Speaking of mowing…
Where we live, the grass grows like crazy once the weather warms up a little bit and I am ever so grateful for the riding mower that helps me (sort of) keep up with it. Lawnmowers of every kind, however, for all of the beauty they bring about by enabling neatly manicured lawns, are potential hazards. Here’s how to minimize those hazards:

Whether you’re mowing or weed whacking, wear protective eye gear, long pants and long sleeves. If the equipment is loud enough, wear ear plugs too. It might be too warm for covered skin, but I can tell you from experience that a flying rock set in motion by a weed whacker will do some serious damage to your bare skin!

Only gas up when the engine is cool and in a well-ventilated area (like outside!), and store the gasoline in a safe place, out of reach of any little hands as well as in a place where it can’t be knocked over. Obviously, you should only use an approved container for storing the gas as well. (Need I say you shouldn’t be smoking while refueling? I didn’t think so.)

2) Commonsense tool and chemical storage
In addition to keeping the gasoline stored in a safe place, make sure any lawn-care tools and chemicals are as well. This is for the protection of the kids and you. Sure, it’s a cliché from a cartoon to see someone step on a rake and get hit in the face, but guess what? It happens. Anything with sharp edges, like a rake or pruning shears, needs to be stored in such a way that injuries can’t happen. Be broadminded when you think about what falls into this category of tools needing commonsense storage: Even a small digging tool for ferreting out dandelion weeds can be potentially dangerous depending on the circumstances–and the (little) hands that get hold of it.

Chemicals such as fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides also must be kept out of reach, and—like the gasoline—stored so they can’t accidentally get knocked over. And always, always keep these chemicals in their original containers!

3) Keep sidewalks and walkways clear
OK, I admit it: I am lazy when it comes to putting hoses away, and this is dangerous. Hoses, extension cords, power cords…if you’re dragging something across the lawn and front walk to do some yard maintenance, make sure you drag whatever it is back again and put it away so no one trips over it.

Also give these walkways and any outdoor stairs a good once over, checking for tripping hazards or even loose boards. The freezing cold of winter can cause sidewalks to crack or even buckle, and the wet weather can wreak havoc on wood.

4) Remove the attractive hazards
You might see just a ladder and a bucket lying out in your yard, but you know what you’re really looking at? A good fall and a drowning hazard. Kids will be kids. Put the ladder away as soon as you’re done with it, and put any buckets out of reach of kids too. Remember that a bucket hardly needs any water to be a drowning hazard for a young child. And there’s no reason to have it out anyway, right? I mean, you’re working on making your yard pretty, so think of stuff like this as “clutter” and get it out of sight, and you’ll be safe as well as tidy.

For those of us who suffer through long, dreary winters, the warmer weather of spring and summer is to be savored outdoors whenever we get the chance. Let’s make sure that we’re around to do that savoring by following some yard maintenance safety tips!

Be Wary of Winter Weather by Giving Your Roof a Late Winter Review

Yes, signs of spring are popping up all over, and so are the reminders that winter is still upon us. “The Ides of March” have been words of foreboding for centuries, and we do well to approach the middle of the month with the same caution…especially when it comes to our roofs.

Be wary of winter weather when it comes to your roof. All kinds of damage might have happened during the earlier part of the winter, and the time to get any problems fixed is now, as much as you want to wait for warmer, drier days.

Here are just a few of the parts of your roofing setup that might be damaged—and dangerous—and therefore in need of repair sooner rather than later:

Gutters can get clogged or damaged
Clogged gutters can lead to all kinds of issues beyond just the annoying overflow that dumps water on your head as you walk out your back door. When gutters aren’t free flowing, water sits, stagnates and can lead to damage to those gutters, such as rust and decay. That water can also end up backing up into the house or dripping onto the siding, depending on how your gutters are attached, to do water damage. Oh, and mosquitoes are all too happy to use your stagnate water for laying eggs.

When doing your inspection, also make sure the gutters are still at the correct pitch to ensure the water flows out. Branches knocking against the house or ill-placed ladders used to hang Christmas lights can bend gutters, disrupting the intended flow.

Shingles can get loose
Loose shingles might seem to be annoying only, noisily flapping when it’s windy. But they are a threat to the integrity of your roof. Consider why they are there in the first place: to keep rain out. As someone who has had to rebuild one third of a house that was almost ruined by water damage, I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to keep even the tiniest bit of water from gaining access to anywhere it shouldn’t be! And loose shingles can easily become missing shingles once another windstorm blows in!

Flashing can become loose around skylights, vents and chimneys
Water can get into even the tiniest opening—and will! Water wants only to flow downward. If rain is pounding upon the roof and there’s a tiny opening that water can seep through, trust me, it will! And even just a little water can do a lot of damage. Check the flashing around anything that protrudes from your roof, to make sure water is being kept out. And look for loose flashing elsewhere too. Flashing usually has a reason for being wherever it was installed. Make sure it stays put!

Why not wait until spring?
Sure, we’d all rather wait for better weather before tackling any roof repairs—but we shouldn’t. That’s because anything that’s even just a wee bit damaged will likely get worse as the weather continues. A loose shingle can become a flyaway shingle in a strong wind. A crack in the seal around a skylight can let in a little bit of water that can do a whole lot of damage. A clogged (or loose) gutter can let excess rainfall end up somewhere it shouldn’t be. Yes, waiting would be nicer, but it’s never too soon to keep your roof safe from weather damage!

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Customer Reviews

I feel so much better knowing my family is protected! I spoke with SafeStreets USA in the evening and a technician was able to come install the system for me then for my parents first thing the next morning. Very impressed with his knowledge and care!

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We had our ADT system installed by SafeStreets USA and were really impressed with the service we received from our technician. He was very friendly and answered all of our questions on the system and how it worked. He set everything up in a couple of hours and was a real pleasure to talk with []

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