Tag Archives: security systems

Think You Can’t Afford Home Security? 3 Ways Home Security Pays for Itself

According to Statista, less than one-third of Americans have a home security system. Is that because they think they can’t afford it, or that it’s a luxury item or only needed by the very rich? If so, that thinking is misguided. It’s all a matter of perspective. Once you understand the true value of protection and peace of mind, it doesn’t seem expensive at all. And if a family is dishing out a couple hundred dollars a month for cell phones, the cost of a home security system pales in comparison.

Besides, a home security can pay for itself. Here’s how:

1) It can minimize fire or water damage
Your home security system can include monitoring for fire, smoke, carbon monoxide and even flooding. In situations where minutes count, like a fire, your home security system can get help to your house faster to minimize damage to your home, property and possessions.

2) It can keep a burglar at bay
A home security system can’t guarantee your home won’t be burgled, but it can decrease the chances. A burglar strikes every 13 seconds in the U.S. and homes with an obvious home security system are less likely to be targeted. How does that pay for itself? By preventing the costs of a theft. Studies say thefts costs about $2,000 to replace stolen items, but your time has value too. A home burglary will mean a lot of time on the phone and dealing with paperwork, plus the psychological damage done to you and your kids sense of safety. And that’s expensive!

3) It can lower your homeowner’s insurance premium
This is not a guaranteed cost savings, but worth looking into because many insurance companies will discount your homeowner’s insurance if you have a home security system.

It’s not all that much money
Maybe none of these cost-saving arguments really matters, however, if you consider how little a home security system costs compared to other common household expenses. A home security system costs an average of $35 per month depending on your vendor and features. That’s a little over a dollar per day. In comparison, most people spend far more than that on gas for the car, restaurant meals, and even fancy coffees: 10 coffees at $3.50 a pop adds up to $35. What’s worth more, 10 lattes or a safe and secure home?

When you look at it that way, is a home security system really that expensive?

3 Easy Ways to Bolster Your Home Security

A home security system is one of the best ways to protect your home, both because the sign in the yard is a “line in the sand,” and because the noise of the alarm can scare off a burglar before they do much damage. But your home and family are safer if you have more than just a home security system. You also need a practical and pragmatic approach, one that will lead to comprehensive coverage.

Below are just a few easy ways to increase your home security setup:

1) Level up your locks and bolster your bolts
If your window and door locks came preinstalled, take another look at them and make sure they measure up. We’ve heard stories of those types of locks being easy for burglars to force open. Read more about types of locks and what to look for here.

And once you’ve leveled up your locks and bolstered your bolts, make sure you lock your doors and windows whenever you leave. This includes your garage and any outbuildings too. With the right home security system, you can lock doors remotely should you or your kids forget to do so. But it’s better to make sure everyone is in the habit of locking all entry points all the time—even second-story windows.

2) Keep temptations out of sight
It’s shocking how many people almost invite burglars in by leaving temptations in plain sight…things like fancy bikes or expensive equipment in the yard, or valuable objects that can easily be seen through a big window. Take a look around: What temptations are you leaving in plain sight? Hide them.

Packages on the front porch are also a temptation. They might not lead to a burglar breaking in, but they will lead to someone coming on to your property and stealing from you nonetheless…and giving someone a chance to get a better look at your house for a burglary later. Try these alternatives to getting packages without getting done in.

3) Be tricky about it
If you scan the Internet, you’ll quickly learn people have all kinds of ways to make their house less attractive to burglars. We usually suggest having a car in the driveway and using your home automation system to turn lights on and off so it looks like someone is home. But we’ve also read great ideas like leave a big pair of men’s work boots right outside the door, and a big dog bowl and leash on the front porch. Beware of dog signs seem to be useful too. Your goal is to make your house less attractive, and making it look like someone is home and that you own a big dog can help.

Your home security system will do a lot to deter burglars, but you’ll be even safer if you take other precautions as well to both make your house less appealing and make it harder to break into. The best burglar deterrent is a well-advertised home security system, but use commonsense to keep your home and family safe too!

5 Ways to Make Your Home Less Attractive to Burglars—so They Pass You by

We usually don’t think about home burglaries until it’s too late. It always seems like something that will happen to someone else, right? But with a home burglary taking place every 13 seconds in the U.S., there’s a very good chance that someday that “someone else” will be one of us.

The time to take action to prevent a burglary is before such a tragedy strikes. And prevention is probably easier than you thought. One of the most important steps you can take is to simply make your home less appealing to a burglar looking for an easy target.

We offer five such tips below. While these tips shouldn’t take the place of a traditional home security system, they may convince a burglar to pass by your house and choose a different target instead:

1) Get a fence
Burglars want to get in and out of a home within a few minutes. Having a fence to jump over can be a huge deterrent, especially if it’s a metal or wooden picket fence with pointed tops. A fence can definitely make a burglar think twice about breaking into your home because they could be injured or get hung up on the fence posts as they try to clear it. One caveat to this, however: Don’t make your fence so tall that it blocks your house from the street. With a fence like that, a burglar will be more tempted by your property because—once over the fence—they can work in privacy.

2) Leave the dog outside
If you have a dog, get a “Beware of Dog” sign and display it clearly. Move the doghouse into a visible spot in the yard and let the dog run around (weather permitting). A burglar wants to get in and out of a home as quickly as possible, and a dog introduces many variables. A burglar won’t know if a dog is friendly, or will bark loudly or even attack. When a dog is on the premises, the burglar will likely move on to the next target.

3) Trim bushes and shrubs
Burglars like places to hide while they break in, so trim any bushes or shrubs that are getting big enough for a grown man to hide behind. Focus on those shrubs near entry points like doors and windows, and remember to do the same for garage doors and windows too. A couple of hours with a pair of hedge clippers should be sufficient time to eliminate any hiding places and make your house less appealing.

Install bear traps and trip-activated nets
Just kidding! You don’t need a lawsuit on your hands.

4) Light walkways
Although most burglaries happen during the day, your house is at risk during the night time hours too. Plenty of outdoor lighting that will expose anyone sneaking on to your property can make your home less appealing to a burglar. In addition to other exterior lighting tips we’ve offered in the past, consider adding small solar lights along your driveway and walkway. You can buy these in packs at any major hardware store. The solar panels charge internal capacitors during the day, then emit a low-level LED light at night, thereby increasing the visibility in your yard without being distracting. This will make potential burglars easier to spot, which will turn them away to an easier target.

5) Put away your ladder
Burglars usually break in through the front door (34%), first-floor window (23%) or back door (22%). But every once in a while they will get in through a second story window if they have access (2%). For that reason, you should stash away your ladder rather than leave it where a burglar can use it to reach that open window.

Final thoughts
These are simple steps you can take to make your home less appealing to burglars without much effort, and they say an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. To take yet another step to protect your home and make it a challenging target for burglars, consider investing in a home security system equipped with motion sensors, cameras, and door and window sensors. Modern plans may be less expensive than you think, and peace of mind is priceless.

9 Ways Your Home Automation System Can Keep Kids Safe When They’re Home Alone

Following the high-profile abduction cases that led to pictures of missing children on milk cartons and much more diligence on the part of parents, studies show that far fewer kids are home alone these days: The number of grade-school American children who spend time at home alone has plunged by almost 40% since 1997.

Yet there are still those situations when kids will be unattended, at least for a short while, as much as parents would like to avoid it. Or the kids will be old enough to be unsupervised, but haven’t quite proved they are trustworthy before that day comes.

In either case, your home security system can help. Below are nine ways you can use your home security or home automation system to keep your kids safe and your sanity intact when your children are home alone:

  1. You can get alerts when a code used to unlock the front door, so you’ll know when your child has arrived home. If you’ve ever sat there waiting for a child to return a text message to you, letting you know they got home safely, you’ll know how nice this can be!
  2. Window and door sensors can alert you when a window or door is opened, so you can check in with your child.
  3. A video camera at the front door can show you (or your child) who is knocking.
  4. If you’ve said no video games, you can monitor the room that has that tempting distraction with a video camera to make sure rules are followed.
  5. A security video camera can also be used to monitor the yard (which is also helpful for those families who must leave a mischievous pet home alone).
  6. If your child is too young or your teenager too forgetful for properly monitoring the heating or air conditioning, you can use your home automation system to regulate the thermostat.
  7. Your home automation system can also be used to turn lights on automatically, either to make sure the house is lit when your child gets home on a dark winter afternoon, or to make sure your house is lit when you get home at the end of the day—because teenagers simply won’t think about it.
  8. As a parent with a child home alone, you can also get peace of mind knowing your home security system offers fire, carbon monoxide and flood monitoring.
  9. And if your kids need to leave the house, you can lock doors remotely should they forget.

Views about how much latitude children should have and at what age have changed drastically over the past 70 years, especially in the past 20 as we have turned into helicopter parents. (You can find a fascinating breakdown of changing parental attitudes over the decades by reading the results of this Slate study.)

My own kids are all grown and gone now and in their own apartments, and I still worry about them and wait for replies to texts so I know they’re okay. I guess some things never change, but at least technology makes it easier to keep an eye on them even when we’re not around.

Homeowner’s Insurance and Home Security: 3 Things You Need to Know

At our house, we’ve been talking about our mortgage payment because it switches to an adjustable rate mortgage at the end of this year and we’re nervous. We also got our property tax bill last week and it was significantly higher than in previous year’s—about 25% higher, which was a surprise. All that adds up to housing costs being top of mind today!

Fortunately, among the trifecta of home ownership costs—mortgage, property taxes and insurance—homeowners do have some control over one of the three at least: insurance.

If you’re shopping around for less expensive homeowner’s insurance as a way to defray other costs such as rising mortgage rates or increasing property taxes, below you’ll find some useful advice on lowering your costs,

One, how to lower the cost of your homeowner’s insurance
The Insurance Information Institute lists 12 practical ways to lower your homeowner’s insurance costs:

  1. Shop around: You never know when you might find a better deal!
  2. Raise your deductible: The Institute says raising your deductible to $1,000 could save you as much as 25% on your insurance!
  3. Insure the house, not the land: People get confused about the value of their home because they think in terms of what they paid for it. But you don’t need to insure your land, only your home. If you paid $350,000 to buy your house and $250,000 of that was for the house, you only need to insure against that $250,000.
  4. Get a bundled discount when you buy your homeowner’s and auto insurance from the same insurer.
  5. Disaster-proof your home, as much as you’re able. The tasks involved depend on where you live and the kinds of natural disasters that are common in your area. But you might get a discount on your insurance by being prepared. Plus you might minimize the damage should a disaster strike!
  6. Emphasize home security: Smoke detectors, dead-bolt locks, a home security system…insurance companies will give you a discount when you emphasize home security because you are both deterring an incident, as well as minimizing damage should an incident occur.
  7. See if you can get a discount either based on age or through a professional association.
  8. Maintain a good credit score. Many insurers look at your credit score when determining how much they’ll charge you for your insurance.
  9. Stay put…with that insurer, that is. If you can find a good deal with the insurer you already have, stay put for discounts that come from longevity. Of course, if those discounts don’t lower the costs enough to beat out another insurer, it might make more sense to leave!
  10. Review what you’re insuring once per year. Some items covered by your homeowner’s insurance might decline in value, or you might not own them any longer.
  11. If you’re in a government plan, shop around and see if private insurance might be cheaper.
  12. Consider the cost of insurance even before you make an offer on that new house. A house with an outdated electrical system might cost you more in insurance, for example, or one that’s farther away from the nearest fire extinguisher.

Two, get a home security system
A home security system can lower your costs for homeowner’s insurance by up to 20%, but a home security system is also a deterrent—and wouldn’t you rather avoid the burglary in the first place? Since 90% of burglars say they ignore a house with an obvious home security system, you’ll decrease the chance of a break-in, which protects not only your property but also your peace of mind.

Third, do an inventory just in case
Despite the best laid plans, your house might be burglarized. If that happens, you’ll lose items of monetary value, but you’ll also lose your sense of security—for a while, at least. It will be hard to feel safe in your own home. You can minimize the damage done by a burglary with an inventory done ahead of time. An inventory will only note your physical possessions, not your mental state, but having that document will give you something concrete to hang on to and work with in your initial shock. Find tips for a household inventory here.

A home is one of the biggest investments you’ll ever make, and it does come with ongoing costs for the mortgage, taxes and insurance. It’s also full of your prized possessions, memorabilia and family. You want to keep all of it safe, but you don’t have a bottomless budget. Use these tips to get the most out of your homeowner’s insurance and see if that helps.

Burglars Getting in Through the Garage? Yep! It’s That Easy

Some time back, a YouTube video showing how to break into a garage in 6 seconds went viral. Then videos showing how to prevent such a break-in proliferated, including this Texas news clip.

The idea is that a burglar quickly and easily gets into your garage, then shuts that door and gains effortless access to your house. Yes, an open garage door is noticeable, but if it is then closed quickly, chances are it won’t be noticed. And the burglar is in. Even if the door between your garage and house is locked, the burglar is now able to take his or her time breaking through that door to gain entry. A home security system would set off an alarm, but most burglars are fast, in and out of a home in between 8 and 12 minutes, which gives them plenty of time before the police show up.

Although the garage door is not the most common way to break into a home—thieves use the garage to gain access to a house 9% of the time—you as a homeowner want to prevent any kind of access point to decrease your chances of becoming a victim. And much of the advice for preventing garage break-ins is the same as general home security advice. So we offer tips below that are specific to your garage and your house both…

Make your house less appealing
Burglars don’t choose houses at random. They know exactly what they’re looking for. Decrease the appeal of your house and garage with these tips:

  • Cut back trees or shrubs by the road that give burglars a place to hide while they break into the garage. If you have a tall fence curbside that provides cover, consider replacing it with something shorter that neighbors and passers-by can see over.
  • If you have a detached garage and a burglar might be tempted to steal from that, not your house, don’t keep expensive equipment out in the open where it becomes an invitation to break in.
  • Make it look like someone is home. Keep the spare car in the driveway, not parked on the road. Use your home automation system to have lights turn on and off automatically. Have packages delivered to your workplace rather than left on your doorstep.
  • Make sure your home security system sign is clearly visible from the road.
  • Double check your lighting by going out at night and looking at your house and garage from the street. Does your lighting leave shadows where a thief could hide while breaking into your garage?

Practice prevention
Sometimes the old sayings are the best sayings, and in this case, a pinch of prevention is worth a pound of cure definitely applies.

  • Even if you won’t be gone long, keep your garage doors locked, both the large door on the front of the garage and any regular doors used to access the garage on foot, either from the outside or from the house. Use heavy-duty locks. Also make sure any garage windows also have better locks than the factory-installed kind.
  • Take advantage of the remote capabilities of your home security system to double check that the doors are locked when you’re not at home.
  • Install home security cameras in obvious places where a burglar can see they’re going to be seen while trying to break in.

Much of this advice applies to other outbuildings too, even if no one can gain access to your house through an outbuilding. They can still steal expensive tools and violate your property while erasing any sense of security you once had. In that way, home security measures should be comprehensive, taking into account more than your house to include any part of your property that is vulnerable—including that sturdy looking garage.

Wired vs. Wireless Home Security: A Rundown of the Ways Wireless Wins

The number of households in the U.S. with a home security system hasn’t changed much in the past 10 years. In 2008, 33.47 million people said they own a home with a home security system. In 2017, that number was 35.44—which might seem like a significant increase except has peaked at much higher and gone down, although it looks like it might be trending up again.

What has changed is the type of home security people have. Older systems were hardwired and today’s home security and automation systems tend to be wireless—although they have the same basic features and components.

Our world is wireless
In today’s wireless world, we kind of expect everything to be wireless. We want WiFi everywhere and always-on access to the Internet-enabled apps on our smart phones. It’s only natural that we’re going to want wireless home security too.

A wireless home security solution is not the obvious first choice, however, if you’re shopping around and debating between wireless and hardwired. There are times when a hardwired solution is the way to go. For most of us, that’s not the case and a wireless home security system makes the most sense.

Ways it’s wireless
When talking about home security systems, wireless has two meanings. The system itself is wireless within your home, relying on WiFi to work. And the system is remotely accessible to you, again via WiFi.

A wireless home security system is much easier to install because it has—you guessed it—no wires. No drilling is required, no wires must be worked into and snaked through walls to come out a different hole elsewhere in the house. A wireless home security system requires the same number of wires as your wireless phone: zero.

That means you can easily expand your home security system later, if you want to. You can add features, and you can add more coverage, say to your garage or another outbuilding, or with more video cameras outside.

Where to find wireless
If you’re either upgrading your current home security system or you’re moving into a new home and buying one for the first time, you might wonder whom to trust. After all, every home security vendor out there seems like a reputable one, right? You can check consumer reviews to see if they are as good as they claim to be. For example, SafeStreets USA scores 7.6 out of 10 according to reviews at Best Company. Since that’s based on almost 150 consumer reviews, that’s a trustworthy score.

Whether you decide hardwired or wireless home security works best for your home, you’re taking steps to protect it, and you can do so with peace of mind when you choose a well-rated vendor with a strong reputation.

Stay Ahead of the Curve with a Home Security System

In the United States, over 2 million home burglaries are reported each year, with a home burglary taking place once every 13 seconds. Time how long it takes you to read this short blog post. How many burglaries happened during those few minutes?

Shocking, right? But perhaps not as shocking as this statistic: Only about 10% of Americans live in homes with home security systems. Given that homes with home security are much less likely to be broken into, why do so few people have home security systems?

Even burglars say home security systems deter burglars
Homes without a security system are three times more likely to get broken into and most burglars say they avoid homes with obvious home security systems, such as a yard sign out front. If we do the math, we find out that 90% of the homes in the U.S. are three times more vulnerable than the other 10%–which probably makes the other 10% even safer because burglars have plenty of unprotected houses to choose from!

You’ve probably heard the ADT slogan about the yard sign being a line in the sand, and we’ve written about the power of that statement in another blog post. When you realize that only 10% of homes are protected and how much of a deterrent that protection provides, you can see that that yard sign wins because it wins the battle upfront when the burglar passes on by.

If you’ve been thinking about a home security system and you’re still undecided about whether or not to make the investment, maybe it’s time to be ahead of the curve and join the minority that has a home security system—before you unwillingly become part of the group that has already been burglarized.

The costs of a home burglary: more than you think
A home security system does not have to be an expensive investment, and when you compare the costs of the peace of mind to the potential costs of a burglary, all of a sudden it seems cheap. Statistics say the average burglary costs a homeowner about $2,000 in lost goods. That might not sound like much, but that’s because it doesn’t take into account other costs, including:

  • The costs of replacing broken doors, windows or doorjambs
  • The trauma of the invasion, which can take years to recover from
  • The irreplaceable value of family heirlooms
  • A higher homeowner’s insurance premium

Without a home security system and your own “line in the sand” in the form of a home security sign in the front yard, your home ranks among the 90% of American homes that lack that protection—and it’s much more appealing to burglars as a result. Wouldn’t you rather stay ahead of that curve and move on into the 10%?

Phone, Wallet, Keys… How Do You Lock Your House When You Leave?

When you leave the house, do you check to make sure any back or side doors are locked, and then lock your front door on your way out? When you’re home, do you triple check that all the doors are locked before you head to bed?

If this doesn’t sound like you, you may be part of the 7% of Americans who don’t lock their doors when they leave, or the 23% who leave their doors unlocked while they’re home. This YouGov poll found that many homes across the country are unlocked throughout the day, especially while someone is home. That means over 22 million people leave their doors unlocked when they leave the house. We find that number shocking!

For the rest of us who think about home security and therefore do lock our doors when we leave as well as when we’re home, locks are a big deal. But not every lock is created equal. Read up on types of locks and what they’re good for below…

Knob Locks
Knob locks are the kind built into the door handle. Most homes have a knob lock in addition to a deadbolt on exterior doors. These locks should never be the sole security on a door, since the lock is within the knob itself and not in the door like the deadbolt is,  making it easier for someone to break in. Instead, knob locks are better used on interior doors that don’t need as much protection, for example a bathroom door you’ll lock for privacy.

Lever Handle Locks
Lever handle locks are easier to open than knob locks, which is useful if handicap accessibility is a concern. These locks have a large push down lever instead of the turning knob, but a similar lock style to the knob lock. As with knob locks, these are not recommended for sole security on exterior entryways, but can be helpful indoors if someone in your home has difficulty turning knobs—again, think bathroom privacy.

Deadbolts
For real home security, you need deadbolts. Deadbolts are typically installed on household exterior doors. The most common in American homes is the single cylinder deadbolt. These locks secure your home from the outside, but if someone can gain access to the inside of your home such as through an open window, the deadbolt only requires a turn of the thumbturn to open the door. That’s why you want to make sure windows are secured as well when you leave for the day.

Locks of the Future
As you might expect, technology has taken on locks too, making even keys obsolete. From keypads to Bluetooth-enabled deadbolts and even biometrics with fingerprint recognition, the locks that will soon be commonplace will powered by technology and accessed by devices such as smart phones. In addition, home security systems today will let you lock and unlock doors remotely, should you forget to lock the door on the way out or should you need to let the electrician in while you’re at work.

Whichever kind of lock you choose, check the level of security you can expect by checking the rating given by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). ANSI has three grades for door locks to help you know which will provide the most security.

Maybe you’re part of the 93% who lock their doors when they leave, the 77% who lock their doors when they stay, or even a part of the 7% who are (or should be) rethinking their home security habits. No matter which category you fit into, knowing your options on locks can help you make informed decisions on how to keep you and your home safe and secure.

Is Amazon Key the Key to Secure Package Delivery? Or Is Your Home Security System Enough?

By now you’ve probably heard of Amazon Key, the new service from Amazon that will enable delivery people to enter your home. That way, they can deposit packages there as opposed to leaving them on your front porch where they are vulnerable to thieves.

The timing for the announcement lines up perfectly with the startup of the holiday shopping season, as Amazon ramps up for its busiest time of year. And the timing might appeal to you, if you’re thinking about the products you plan to buy through Amazon—and have delivered to your vulnerable front porch.

But the more we thought about it, the more we wondered: Should you get Amazon Key if you already have a home security system? We did a little digging to find out.

Package theft is on the rise
Package theft has risen right alongside the increase in online shopping, after all. According to one report, U.S. homeowners get an average of 27 packages delivered during the course of the year, and 26% get a delivery at least once a week. Of those people receiving deliveries, 23 million people fall victim to “porch pirates” each year, with packages stolen from the front porch.

That same report indicates homeowners want delivery personnel to have access to their homes, citing 69% of people who have been victims of package theft would choose to let a delivery person into their house via an app (such as a home security system equipped with a video camera) rather than have the package left outside, and 28% of those victims would be willing to let the delivery person have access to their home in order to leave packages inside.

Enter Amazon Key…

What is Amazon Key?
Amazon Key is a new service that lets people into your house to deliver packages from Amazon. To use Amazon Key, you must have a certain type of smart lock and in-home video camera. According to our research, you can choose from three locks, all sold by Amazon, but there is only one camera that will work: the Cloud Cam Key Edition in-home camera. The camera and smart lock talk to each other via your home’s WiFi. The locks come in a range of prices, and the camera only one price, so the whole package costs between $249 and $319 after a bundled discount.

With Amazon Key, the delivery person scans a barcode, sending a request to Amazon. Amazon grants permission to unlock by telling your camera to start recording. The courier gets a prompt on their app, swipes the screen to your smart lock, and unlocks your door. They drop off the package and then relock your door with another swipe. You get notified that your delivery has been delivered, and voila! All done.

What about your home security system?
Amazon Key might make sense for people who do a lot of online ordering yet also spend a lot away from home. But there is a cost to get set up as noted above, and what if you already have a home security system? With the right kind of home security system, you can use a video camera to see who is at the door, unlock the door remotely to let a delivery person in, and then lock the door again when they leave. Granted, you have to be accessible at the time the delivery person shows up, meaning you’re not tied up in a meeting or on a conference call. But do you need both? It’s something to think about.

According to one reporter’s trial run with Amazon Key, it sounds like you have to disarm your home security system in order for Amazon Key to work, and delivery people are instructed not to open your door if they hear barking or scratching that indicates a dog. We don’t blame them: People are often bitten by dogs that “don’t bite,” and who wants to be the one to accidentally let Fido fly out the door to roam the neighborhood unsupervised? That means even Amazon Key can’t keep your packages off the front porch, regardless of your smart lock and special camera.

Alternatives to Amazon Key
If package theft is a concern for you, especially as the holidays approach, note that Amazon Key is not your only option for package protection, however. You can also:

  • Choose to have your package delivered to a nearby Amazon locker.
  • Choose to have your package shipped to your local UPS store.
  • Have packages delivered to you at work.
  • Build relationships with trusted neighbors who can either receive packages on your behalf or get them from the front porch for you after delivery.
  • Explore other package theft prevention options now on the market, such as the Package Guard, a small disk on which a package is placed, and that sounds an alarm if that package is picked up.
  • Use your home security system to see who is at your door and to unlock the door if it’s a package delivery.

Our conclusion after this research? It depends. For some, Amazon Key will be the way to prevent to package theft. For others, an up-to-date home security system might suffice…and save some cash.

View all of our security plans and features!

Customer Reviews

I feel so much better knowing my family is protected! I spoke with SafeStreets USA in the evening and a technician was able to come install the system for me then for my parents first thing the next morning. Very impressed with his knowledge and care!

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We had our ADT system installed by SafeStreets USA and were really impressed with the service we received from our technician. He was very friendly and answered all of our questions on the system and how it worked. He set everything up in a couple of hours and was a real pleasure to talk with []

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